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610
THE IRON INDUSTRY.
TABLE XXXIII-.A. Discordant Data on Steel Output in Germany.
.    Source of Information.	1898	1899	1900	1901
Swank • Am, I. & S Ass., 1901 ..........		6.328,668	6 365 350	
Mineral Industry, 19ul ... ..........	6 734 307	6 290.434	6 646,869	
Kentzoch. ... ...........................	5 065,896	6,667,050	6,646,869	
Gemeinfass. Darstell, 1901 ..............	4 362 831	4.791,022	4,790,000	
Wedding* ..............................		4,967,770		
	441 601	467 721	852 935	
Blooms, ^billetS) etc. ..... . .........	986 572	1 040,670	1,183128	
	4,362,831	4,820,275	4,825,587	
				
Total ..... . .......................	6,781,004	6,328,666	6,361,660	
				107 210
Bess, and 0. H. ingots ..............				6287 012
				
Total ......................... .....			6,646,860	6,394,222
				
* Private Communication.
Much confusion is caused by differences in classification. The term "iron and steel productions" may include, pig-iron and may not. The term "bar-iron" may mean wrought-iron, or may include steel, as soft steel is called ingot-iron on the Continent. Sometimes steam engines are in "iron and steel exports/3 and sometimes under machinery. It is difficult to find the truth without a detailed analysis of the original records, which is not often practicable.
The iron producers may be divided into three classes according •to the quantity of pig-iron and steel they produce. First, and almost in a class by itself, is the United States; next come Germany and Great Britain. These three nations produce eighty per cent, of all the coal, pig-iron and steel made in the world, and nearly seventy per cent, of the iron ore.
In the next class are France, Eussia, Austria and Belgium. These four nations produce eighteen per cent, of all the pig-iron and steel made in the world, and fifteen per cent, of all the coal and iron ore.
The third class includes Sweden and Spain, which are important as sources of the iron supply for the greater nations, but which have no coal for smelting. In the same list, but of less importance, are Greece, Algeria, Cuba and Italy, which are widely known for their ore mines, but produce little or no iron.